Overture Easy

A hidden theater haunt, with a surprise side dish

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t’s expensive enough to go to the theater without blowing the rest of your paycheck on dinner. That’s why in-the-know theater goers and actors, actresses, and industry insiders forgo the pricey and pretentious restaurants that have a choke hold on this neighborhood and search out the little Intermission Tavern, in its one-story country-cottage setting wedged in a space no wider than an alley between two taller buildings. It looks like something dreamed up by a set designer, with a staff that comes from central casting (or, at any rate, somewhere other than Boston). You’ll be welcomed by bartenders who will ask your name and shake your hand, and offered the singular best secret of all: the homemade potato chips, served still warm. They make a great side with the humungous burgers, accompanied by a nice cocktail, before, after, or without even going to, a show. Cook

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Boston was once the principal tryout town for new shows to be tested on their way to Broadway. Among the classic plays and musicals that debuted here: South Pacific, Oklahoma! (originally called Away We Go), The Sound of Music, Our Town, A Streetcar Named Desire, A Long Day’s Journey Into Night, Porgy and Bess, Carousel, Candide, and The King and I.

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