Gyro Power

A hidden Greek grill that’s friendly, cheap—and good

FarmGrill_NewtonPhoto: Susan Ogan

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n the Mc-Restaurant wasteland of perpetually bustling Needham Street, Farm Grill & Rotisserie stands out as a tribute to family-run independents. The casual, always-buzzing Greek-style restaurant serves up everything from pastizio (a traditional Greek dish of macaroni noodles and ground beef topped with a cream sauce) to swordfish kebabs, but without question the main reason to go is the gyro plate: your choice of tangy, herb-marinated lamb or chicken, piled high with toppings on a flat bread. Service is counter-style and friendly—choose your entrée and sides from the extensive selection, or try a little of everything—and the prices are low. The atmosphere is almost cartoonish, with Greek statues guarding the entrance and Mediterranean murals on the walls and ceiling. But it beats golden arches and life-size clowns. Burns

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The word “gyro” is derived from the Greek term for “turn,” as on a spit

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